Review: Ruger SR1911 Lightweight Officer-Style Model .45ACP | Outdoor Channel
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Review: Ruger SR1911 Lightweight Officer-Style Model .45ACP

The newest offering from Ruger is 7 ounces lighter than Ruger's full size SR1911

The Officers-Style model is a 1911 pistol with a 3.6-inch barrel and a slightly shortened grip frame. (Photo courtesy of Down Range TV) The Officers-Style model is a 1911 pistol with a 3.6-inch barrel and a slightly shortened grip frame. (Photo courtesy of Down Range TV)

By: Ed Head

Those clever rascals at Ruger are at it again. Busily plotting and scheming to introduce one new product after another they keep their dedicated fan base panting with desire. Actually, it’s a corporate philosophy that new products drive sales and grow the company and you can’t argue with that – Ruger has shown they can produce two million or more guns a year.

The Ruger SR1911 line continues to expand with the latest example being the pistol I have at hand, an Officer’s Style .45ACP. As you may recall, earlier this year Ruger produced their first Officer’s sized 1911 in 9mm and, as expected, one in .45ACP has followed. That’s actually clever marketing because, these days, the 9mm is more popular than the .45, chiefly because the ammunition is less expensive and 9mm pistols are easier to shoot. Fortunately, those of us who revere the .45ACP didn’t have to wait too long for the little blaster to appear in our favorite caliber.

The origin of the short-barreled Officer’s Model dates back to 1975 and Rock Island Arsenal, where they produced a cut down version of the 1911 for issue to general officers. Colt followed this in 1985 with a 3.5” barreled all-steel Officers Model. In 1986 Colt expanded the line with a lightweight aluminum frame version. Since Colt owns the name Officer’s Model when Ruger began producing these pistols they called them Officer’s-Style. Confused? Don’t be. What we’re talking about here is a 1911 pistol with a 3.6-inch barrel and a slightly shortened grip frame.

Getting small 1911s to run reliably can be rather tricky. The further you get from John Moses Browning’s original 5-inch barreled design the more likely you are to run into reliability issues. It has to with complicated issues like slide mass versus recoil spring strength and how quickly the magazine presents the cartridge and at what angle. Too, things were simpler back in JMB’s day as the ammunition he designed, the full metal jacketed 230 grain .45 ACP round, was optimal for the pistol and the only game in town. These days, the variety of .45 ammunition in various bullet weights and shapes makes getting a small pistol – or any pistol – to run reliably with all of it a difficult proposition.

Read the rest of “Review: Ruger SR1911 Lightweight Officer-Style Model .45ACP” at DownRange.tv.

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